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Sushi Rice
Make great sushi with
Brown or White Sushi Rice!

Making great sushi starts with great rice. High quality sushi rice will have very few (if any) broken rice grains. Broken rice grains lead to a "mushy sushi". All sushi rice is short grain rice, but it comes in different qualities based on grain integrity. The sticky consistency should NOT come from overcooked or overworked rice. The sticky sushi rice is made by the addition of a mixture of rice wine vinegar, sugar, and salt.

For great a great sushi rice recipe, check out the Sushi guide

Rice Paddy

When first picked, all rice is brown.  Following the removal of the outer husk and the top ‘germ’ layer of the grain, rice becomes white. The grains will then be polished before they are packaged and sold as white rice. Brown rice has had the husk removed but kept its germ: the nutrient-rich layer that white rice has had scrubbed off. Wild rice grains are kept in their entirety, with both the germ and the husk intact. Brown and Wild rice varieties have the most nutritional value in terms of vitamins and fiber, however white rice offers pure carbohydrates that are necessary for energy. The lack of fiber in sushi rice is compensated for by the Nori wrapping, thus making a single piece of sushi quite a well-balanced nutritional treat.

Rice

Cooking any rice comes with an element of trepidation for most people, and that’s why I always recommend using an automatic rice cooker. Consistency is the name of the game. Depending on when the rice is harvested, there might be more or less moisture in the grains, and that will slightly affect your finished product. Don't feel bad if you get a bad batch of rice. You can learn from your mistake and add more or less water depending on your outcome. Once you get a recipe that works, you shouldn’t have to worry too much about how the rice will turn out. High quality sushi rice will have very few (if any) broken rice grains, so avoid over-processing the rice. Broken grains lead to a "mushy sushi" that is very disappointing. The sticky consistency should NOT come from overcooked or overworked rice. The rice is sticky because of an indispensable starch content and the addition of a mixture of rice wine vinegar, sugar, and salt.
 
Sushi rice recipes will not always work on the first try. If you are using a gas stove and someone else uses an electric rice cooker, there will be 2 different outcomes. Sushi rice recipes should be seen as a guide and adjustments will need to be made to fit your own circumstances.

For great a great sushi rice recipe, check out the Sushi guide




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